IBCS in a Complex Battlefield Environment [Defence24.pl TV]

PUBLISHED AT: Friday, 24 November 2017, 17:45

But as the threat evolves, as I mention, the US decided we can't rely on a single integrated sensor and shooter. (...)What we wanted to ensure was that if we were to lose a shooter or a sensor on the battlefield, we're able to stay up and running, and effectively defend the territory that we're defending  – said Tarik Reyes, Vice President, Missile Defense and Protective Systems at Northrop Grumman, speaking about the assumptions for development of the IBCS suite during the Warsaw Security Forum.

Tarik Reyes placed a great emphasis on expansion of airborne threats on the contemporary battlefield. Reyes noted that as a result of evolution, the threats are far more advanced than 3 decades ago.

So I think we can all agree in today's world it's a much more complex environment than it was 30 years ago. Today the quantity of threats around there, from adversaries, the quality of the threat is significant.

Tarik Reyes, Vice President, Missile Defense and Protective Systems at Northrop Grumman

It was also stressed by Reyes that a decision was made in the United States not to rely on a single sensor and a single shooter – in a hierarchical structure. The US Authorities have ordered the Northrop Grumman company to create a net-centric command system for the IADS. The requested solution was required to utilize all assets available on the battlefield, regardless of the sensor or domain within which the given sensor exists.

The development of the IBCS system is a response to the aforesaid threats. The concept, according to which a variety of sensors is employed, enhances the survivability of the IADS on the battlefield. What we wanted to ensure was that if we were to lose a shooter or a sensor on the battlefield, we're able to stay up and running, and effectively defend the territory that we're defending - stated Tarik Reyes.

The Northrop Grumman representative announced that two IBCS Solider Checkout Events were successful. The said initiatives involved the USMC and the Air Force. Reyes also outlined the stages for implementation of the Wisła IBCS implementation. During the first stage Poland would receive two batteries and four fire units, already integrated with the IBCS solution, and tailored to be operated in line with the “every sensor, every shooter” principle. The second phase assumes that integration of Polish radars would take place, thus Wisła would not be based solely on the US-made inventory.

Ultimately the system will have an ability to use systems delivered by a variety of countries and manufacturers. The presentation also shown the G/ATOR radar offered to the US Army, within the scope of the future LTAMDS air defence sensor.

 

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